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How did you fix your broken RB1 drums pedal?


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#1 Shroud

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Posted August 18, 2019 - 02:28 PM

All right so it's about to happen to us too, our RB1 drums pedal is showing cracks at the expected place and will split completely if we play one more Foo Fighters custom...

While we plan our eventual move to real eDrums (but it's going to take months to sort out) I am looking for a way to salvage the pedal. Of course I could buy a whole replacement RB drums kit for as low as 10e, but it bothers me to throw away stuff considering the world is already overwhelmed with garbage. In addition, I just have fun tinkering a bit if I can (this summer I just crafted our own stand for GT steering wheel).

If you have successfully managed to mend a split open pedal or reinforce it before it broke, what are your suggestions? I've seen pics of people screwing a metal plate on top of it, but I don't know how to find an appropriate piece and I don't have tools and skills to cut metal. Would a thin sheet of wood be good enough? Would you glue it or screw it? Or would you try to replace the whole moving part of the pedal?

PS the most hilarious quick-fix I found is about removing the pedal from the base, taping a magnet to your foot and tap with it directly on the base :D

#2 Alternity

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Posted August 18, 2019 - 05:09 PM

The only thing that worked for me is a shit ton of tape, and not just around the part where your foot rests, but around the whole pedal so that it holds. It works, but it will make a more-than-annoying squish sound. I'd assume that glue or anything else would not work considering the ammount of force the pedal has to endure, especially on pedal heavy songs.



#3 BornGamerRob

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Posted August 18, 2019 - 07:48 PM

I have used both wood and metal replacements on that crappy out of the box plastic pedal. This was when it was first around so it was easy to find a prefab for either solution. Both solutions worked great (wood never broke, but the metal was better as it fit OVER the new plastic pedal I eventually bought).

 

Looks like the best already done is around $20 with free shipping (not bad IMO).

https://www.ebay.com...9BoCVusQAvD_BwE

 

But if you definitely want to go with the "stuff around the house" option, cutting out a piece of wood and screwing it to the plastic plate would do the trick.

 

I'm well versed in this as I've went through tons of pads, pedals, cords...you name it. Even the ion kit wasn't the god-send I had hoped it'd be. The e-kit was the thing that solved everything. No cross talk, no quickly eroded pads, no more kick pedal issues...so worth the investment for as much as I played drums.


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#4 i0brendan0

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Posted August 18, 2019 - 11:00 PM

i've gone through 3 plastic pedals.... and the only thing that worked was a rb3 pedal with a metal reinforcing plate...

#5 RainbowDash321

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Posted August 19, 2019 - 12:21 AM

I bought RB3 pedal and switch it out on my RB1 drums. RB1 pedal break easy.



#6 jerrylive365

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Posted August 19, 2019 - 05:41 PM

Before I went with an electronic drum kit I would regularly break that cheap stock pedal. Even the replacement pedal with that flimsy metal strip will break in the usual spot.

 

This is what I used...https://www.amazon.c...=gateway&sr=8-2

 

As you can see from the pictures, it comes with hardware that is supposed to be used to attach the covers to your existing pedals in your car. However, I just used the nut and bolt and tossed the L brackets as they were not needed for this fix. Worked great! (Some pedal covers are plastic so make sure you buy the metal ones.)

 

Using the holes on the pedal cover as a guide, I drilled through the RB pedal and fastened the pedal cover on top. Its never broke after that again.

 

Hope this helps!



#7 Damage Inc.

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Posted August 20, 2019 - 02:42 AM

Ive ductaped a butter knife as a support but other than that check out your local goodwill for inexpensive replacements. It sounds like you spend a decent amount of time playing so learn from my mistake, buy an ion drum rocker or an ekit cause itll be cheaper in the long run.  Hair down, Horns up! cheers



#8 Shroud

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Posted August 20, 2019 - 07:12 AM

I have used both wood and metal replacements on that crappy out of the box plastic pedal. This was when it was first around so it was easy to find a prefab for either solution. Both solutions worked great (wood never broke, but the metal was better as it fit OVER the new plastic pedal I eventually bought).

 

...

 

But if you definitely want to go with the "stuff around the house" option, cutting out a piece of wood and screwing it to the plastic plate would do the trick.

 

What kind of / how thick wood did you use?

 

I could use some veneer-type wood that is about 2mm thick, but is it too thin? Or I could use solid wood, ~1cm thick, which is very rigid but on the other hand it's also thicker than the plastic pedal itself.

 

In either case, do you suggest screwing over gluing?

 

Is it difficult to remove the plastic pedal from the base? Because an alternative is to completely replace the plastic pedal with a wooden one, screwing the orange component to the bottom of it, and somehow make room for the spring. But I don't know if I can remove the plastic pedal from where it is attached with a metal bar, without destroying the base as well.



#9 Nintendo113

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Posted August 20, 2019 - 08:08 PM

A friend of mine cut out a think piece of wood and replaced the entire pedal with it. It lasted a long time, but it still cracked where it always does, so my solution has been to put a dumbell at the bottom so it prevents the pedal from moving side to side and more importantly up n down at all. Works perfectly tbh. I'll be getting an ekit whenever the pads finally decide to give. 



#10 BornGamerRob

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Posted August 21, 2019 - 04:28 AM

 

What kind of / how thick wood did you use?

 

I could use some veneer-type wood that is about 2mm thick, but is it too thin? Or I could use solid wood, ~1cm thick, which is very rigid but on the other hand it's also thicker than the plastic pedal itself.

 

In either case, do you suggest screwing over gluing?

 

Is it difficult to remove the plastic pedal from the base? Because an alternative is to completely replace the plastic pedal with a wooden one, screwing the orange component to the bottom of it, and somehow make room for the spring. But I don't know if I can remove the plastic pedal from where it is attached with a metal bar, without destroying the base as well.

 

Use a thick enough piece of wood that is solid enough not to break. 2mm seems rather thin. Sorry, I'm in the US, so we aren't on the metric system, so my apologies if this conversion is terrible, but about .635cm is the equivalent to US 1/4 inch, which would suffice.

 

Screws over glue by far. You can drill through the plastic and come up underneath with some self tapping screws that will catch the wood without going THROUGH the wood (ouch!). OR, just go over the top. Best video that demonstrates what to do would be this:

Just use wood instead of the aluminum he uses. Same theory.

 

You could absolutely replace the whole thing with wood (i did this). You have to knock out the medal pin that is securing it to the back end of the pedal. It becomes tricky as you have to drill a hole in the wood and then push the pin back through the pedal to secure it. From there, you can just screw the wood pedal into the plastic holder. And yes, you have to be careful not to destroy it all when disassembling it. This is MUCH trickier than the above.

 

Good luck!


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#11 Shroud

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Posted August 29, 2019 - 02:19 PM

You have to knock out the medal pin that is securing it to the back end of the pedal.

...

And yes, you have to be careful not to destroy it all when disassembling it. This is MUCH trickier than the above.


How do you achieve this? :)

I've cut 2 pieces of 3mm veneer and shaped them as the pedal. I want to screw these 2 together into the plastic pedal, but to drill it I should first take it off the base... but how do I remove the metal pin?

#12 Shroud

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Posted August 31, 2019 - 02:57 PM

How do you achieve this? :)

I've cut 2 pieces of 3mm veneer and shaped them as the pedal. I want to screw these 2 together into the plastic pedal, but to drill it I should first take it off the base... but how do I remove the metal pin?


All right, it was easier than I thought to just knock it out with a hammer. Off to next stage: drilling and screwing.

#13 Shroud

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Posted September 7, 2019 - 07:12 AM

Well the wood is now screwed onto the plastic. I wanted to post a pic but couldn't find how from the mobile version of the site. Anyway, let's see how long it lasts :D




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