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Dave Brubeck - "Take Five"


Dave Brubeck Take Five

Release Type: User
Audio Type: Single-track
Reductions: Yes (Auto/CAT)
Pitched Vocals: (no vocals)

Band:
Guitar:
Drums:
Vocals:
Bass:
Keys:
Pro Keys:
Pro Guitar:
Pro Bass:

Author Notes

STANDARD KEYS: MrBurpler
 
UPDATE NOTES:
The original chart and release was based on the work of nsw1-6 but it's been completely overhauled with a new tempo map, HQ audio source, venue, redone bass and drums as well as pro keys finally added. If you grabbed the old don't hesitate to pick up the new one.
 
ABOUT THE SONG:
 
"Take Five" was the third track on the album Time Out, recorded in 1959. That was the year Miles Davis and Gil Evans introduced the jazz audience to modal music with the landmark album Kind of Blue, John Coltrane released Giant Steps and Art Farmer and Benny Golson formed their first jazztet. A lot of new things were happening in jazz in those days, but rhythmically, the music was still being played mostly in four-four time. Brubeck had always been interested in polyrhythm and polytonality. The first theory is what drives African music; the second is tied closely to classical. Brubeck had been playing in odd time signatures back in the late 1940s, but it wasn't until he returned from a trip to Turkey in 1958 that he thought about doing an entire album in different time signatures, like six-four, three-four, nine-eight and, in "Take Five," five-four.
 
"Take Five" includes one of the most thrilling drum solos ever recorded, a 2:20 master class in percussive accentuation, colorization and structure. Unlike the rest of Time Out, which was composed by Brubeck, the tune was written by alto saxophonist Paul Desmond. "It was never supposed to be a hit," Desmond said later. "It was supposed to be a Joe Morello drum solo." Morello had joined the quartet in 1956 over Desmond's initial objection: the saxophonist was concerned that Morello's muscular style would jar with his own lyrical approach. Desmond was won over, and when the composer royalties for "Take Five" started pouring in, he must have been relieved Brubeck had stood his ground and insisted on hiring Morello. 



3 Comments

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Zombie Capone
June 23, 2019

Well i didn't expect this one to ever be part RB3 CCC but this is an absolute classic, so it's very welcome. 

Thx for your work :)

Niiiiiice.

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NuttyBoy
June 27, 2019

Great.. Many thanks